Kalev H. Leetaru is the Yahoo! Fellow in Residence of International Values, Communications Technology & the Global Internet at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy in the Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University in Washington, DC.

His award-winning work centers on the application of high performance computing and "big data" to grand challenge problems. He holds three US patents (cited by 44 others) and more than 50 University Invention Disclosures and has been an invited speaker, panelist, and discussant at venues including the Library of Congress, Harvard, Columbia, Stanford, and UC Berkeley, while his work has been profiled in venues as diverse as Nature, the New York Times, BBC, Discovery Channel, The Atlantic, Fortune Magazine, The Economist, Columbia Journalism Review, MSNBC, Que Leer and media outlets in more than 100 countries. His 2011 "Culturomics 2.0" study was selected by The Economist as one of just five science discoveries deemed the most significant developments of 2011, while Foreign Policy named him one of its Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2013. In July 2014 he was named as a Council Member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on the Future of Government. He founded and currently leads the GDELT global catalog of society.
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     Twitter Research to Power Audience Interaction with SyFy's Face Off Series
The SyFy channel's highest-rated unscripted series Face Off will use the next generation of Kalev's Twitter research used in Opposite Worlds to allow viewers the ability to directly affect the outcome of the show. [MORE FEATURES]
     Georgetown Features 'The Wizard of Big Data'
Georgetown Features 'The Wizard of Big Data' [MORE FEATURES]
     Georgetown Features 'The Wizard of Big Data' - Movie
Georgetown Features 'The Wizard of Big Data' - Movie [MORE FEATURES]
     Why Washington and Silicon Valley Must Work Together
Why Washington and Silicon Valley must work together to truly understand the world. [MORE FEATURES]
     Wall Street Journal Features Kalev on Twitter
The Wall Street Journal covered the emerging trend of social media geolocation and featured Kalev discussing the geolocation "arms race". [MORE FEATURES]
     Washington Post Features GDELT GKG World Leader Word Clouds
The Washington Post featured GDELT's new gallery of "world leader word clouds". [MORE FEATURES]
     The New York Times features GDELT
The New York Times' Sunday print edition featured a whole paragraph about GDELT and how it is powering the study of global human society. [MORE FEATURES]
     LA Times Features SyFy Reality Series Opposite Worlds
Kalev created the revolutionary sentiment analysis technology behind the SyFy channel's flagship new reality series, Opposite Worlds, which is among the most sophisticated emotional measurement systems for social media ever created. The show set records across the board in social media engagement with a television series. The first episode was the #1 trending topic globally on Twitter and the series trended globally three times and nationally every night it was on the air. It peaked as the #1 TV series hashtag and consistently ranked among the top 5 series hashtags across broadcast and cable the entire season. Ranked the #1 program in all of broadcast/cable entertainment in tweets/unique, it had more tweets than shows like Duck Dynasty and more tweets/unique than Supernatural, Glee/American Idol, Survivor, Pretty Little Liars, American Horror Story and Wahlburgers. The LA Times recently wrote a feature story about the show and how social media engagement is reshaping the television industry. [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping Violence and Protests in Nigeria
Using GDELT the shared chronology of millions of news articles covering Nigeria over the past year were combined into a single map that makes it possible to see how strongly Nigeria's unrest is clustered into specific geographic regions with unique profiles, turning casual anecdote into geographic atlas, and creating a tool that can be used to communicate these trends more concretely with policymakers. [MORE FEATURES]
     Supercomputing 2013: SGI UV2 Shared Memory and Big Data
Kalev sat down with SGI at the Supercomputing 2013 conference in Denver in November to talk about how he leverages the large shared memory of the SGI UV2 supercomputing platform for his research. [MORE FEATURES]
     New SyFy Reality Series Opposite Worlds Continues to Set Records
The SyFy channel's flagship new reality series, Opposite Worlds, monitors the live Twitter discourse around the show 24/7 to create a realtime "leaderboard" ranking the popularity of each character, which is then used to met out rewards and punishments on the show. Kalev created the underlying emotional technology, which is among the most sophisticated emotional measurement systems for social media ever created. The show, featured on the Twitter blog, continues to set records, becoming SyFy's most social series premiere ever, SyFy.com's top unscripted series debut ever, and its highest rated series premier among young females in six years, capturing more than a million viewers. Its debut ranked among the top five cable entertainment programs and was the #1 trending topic globally on Twitter and the show trended nationally every night it aired. [MORE FEATURES]
     Using Big Data to Map Ukraine's Protest Violence
A new map created for Foreign Policy magazine using GDELT offers a glimpse of what big data can tell us of the unrest in Ukraine through the eyes of the world's news media. Contrary to the image that has emerged in Western media centering on a single square occupied in the capital city, we see instead a conflict that reaches to the farthest corners of a nation, not only between the police and protesters in Kiev, but in protests that have spread to other cities. In short, big data allows us for the first time to map quantitatively how large-scale societal unrest brings a nation together, even as it tears it apart. [MORE FEATURES]
     Kalev's Research Powers New SyFy Reality Series Opposite Worlds
The SyFy channel's flagship new reality series, Opposite Worlds, is a prototype of the future of television in which the online social media discussion around a show for the first time directly controls the show outcomes. Historically the vast majority of television has been delivered in static one-way form to its audience: other than a few highly limited stunts, the majority of the conversation online around a show has no impact on the show itself. The fans can talk about what they want on the show, but that feedback never makes it directly back into the show. Opposite Worlds turns the world of television into a fully interactive experience in which the online discussion around the show's characters on Twitter directly controls the show's outcomes. Read the press release, see when the schedule, or visit the show's website. [MORE FEATURES]
     Kalev Named As One of Foreign Policy Magazine's Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2013
Foreign Policy magazine has named Kalev as one of its Top 100 Global Thinkers of 2013, recognizing "the world's most exciting people ... who have made a measurable difference in politics, business, technology, the arts, the sciences, and more." In its biography of Kalev, FP writes "Kalev Leetaru has a mind for the 21st century, but the soul of an ancient prophet. A master of 'big data,' Leetaru uses high-powered algorithms to analyze vast quantities of news reports and other publicly available intelligence, enabling him to see previously hidden patterns in economic and political developments." See the biography, take a look at the rest of the list, or see his interactive visualization of the global conversation. [MORE FEATURES]
     Technorati Interview About SyFy Opposite Worlds
Technorati ran a wide-ranging interview with Kalev and executive producer JD Roth (the producer of "Beauty & The Geek" and "The Biggest Loser") of how SyFy's flagship new reality show Opposite Worlds is incorporating the audience into the show through a powerful and innovative new social media interactive experience in which the conversation around the show on Twitter actually directly drives what happens on the show. Lauding the show as "breaking new ground on how to interact with the audience" the interview talks about how the future of television will no longer be a passive experience. [MORE FEATURES]
     Featured in BBC "Living Online" Episode
Kalev's Global Twitter Heartbeat study has been widely featured in the world's media, was ranked by Harvard's Nieman Journalism Lab as the #1 social media paper of 2013 and ranked #25 in the Washington Post's list of 40 more maps that explain the world. Most recently it was featured in an episode of BBC's Living Online describing Viraj Puri's work on creating a website to map bullying online in realtime. [MORE FEATURES]
     2013 In Review: What Half a Billion Points Tell Us About 2013's Biggest Stories
All 675 million references to the more than 69 million events captured by GDELT for 2012-2013 were scanned for global patterns in Material Conflict in 2013 compared with 2012, resulting in the largest event-based annual country ranking ever created. A 172-page report was compiled with a one-page country brief for every country, providing a series of maps, charts, graphs, and other visualizations identifying the major emerging patterns of unrest across the world in 2013. [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping the Global Conversation: Foreign Policy Magazine Network Visual of the World
What happens when you take six months of news coverage from around the world and compile a list of every person mentioned and the people they were mentioned alongside? You get a network of 3 million nodes connected by 42 million links. Based on the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph -- a massive compilation of the world's people, organizations, locations, themes, emotions, and events -- this visualization highlights the 25,000 newsmakers mentioned most frequently from April to October 2013 and the 100,000 connections among them. This visualization is, in essence, a snapshot of the global conversation -- not only whom we are talking about and how much, but how each separate discussion is connected to every other discussion and the greater whole. It's a new way of gauging what matters to us, and it's just one of the ways in which big data is changing the way we see the world. Featured in the Dec 2013 print edition of Foreign Policy Magazine. [MORE FEATURES]
     Washington Post Features Global Twitter Heartbeat as Top Map
The Washington Post recently ran a special feature entitled "40 more maps that explain the world" in which it "searched far and wide for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not, with a careful eye for sourcing and detail." Featured at #25 on the list is a visualization from the Global Twitter Heartbeat study visualizing the world's linguistic tapestry through the eyes of Twitter. [MORE FEATURES]
     King Snowden and the Fall of Wikileaks - Foreign Policy
Kalev Leetaru used the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph to identify all people mentioned in articles referencing Edward Snowden, Julian Assange, and Wikileaks. A list was compiled of every person mentioned in each article, and all names mentioned in an article together were connected. The end result was a network diagram of all of the people mentioned in the global news coverage of Snowden, Assange, and Wikileaks the last seven months and who has appeared with whom in that coverage. Clustering and community finding were used make the overall macro-level structure of the network instantly clear, teasing apart the clusters and connections among the newsmakers defining news coverage of government leaking. The findings suggest that Wikileaks is fading in global coverage of leaking, while Snowden has become his own "brand" which is rapidly displacing Wikileaks. [MORE FEATURES]
     Guest Knight Blog Post on Internet Archive Virtual Reading Room
Roger Macdonald and Kalev Leetaru wrote this guest post for the Knight Foundation's blog describing the geographic mapping of the Internet Archive's TV News Archive and the Archive's new "virtual reading room" model to enable large-scale data mining of their collections. The post also debuts the Archive's new Visual Tapestry project that is compiling a visual archive of the complete set of images captured in the Archive's 600 million pages of digitized books. [MORE FEATURES]
     Over 100 Turn Out for GDELT DC Hackathon Hosted by Gallup
Over 100 people showed up for the GDELT hackathon held in Washington, DC on December 18, 2013 hosted by Gallup in their beautiful DC offices. Packing the house to capacity was a cross-section of the major government agencies, thinktanks, thought leaders, and academics from across DC and the nation. The fast talks featured a breathtaking array of groundbreaking research from harnessing big data to make GDELT easier to work with to piloting GDELT for conflict early warning. As 2013 closes, it is tremdendously exciting, honoring, and humbling to see how far GDELT has come since its release this past April and just how widely it is finding use. We cannot wait to see what 2014 brings! [MORE FEATURES]
     Global Twitter Heartbeat Featured as #1 Social Media Study of 2013
Harvard's Nieman Journalism Lab produces a monthly roundup of "the top papers in digital media and journalism" and at end of each year compiles a list of "the best of the year." Coming in at #1 on their list of the dozen most important and influential studies of the 2013 on social media is Kalev's Global Twitter Heartbeat project, a collaboration with SGI and GNIP. See the full paper online with the full-resolution figures. [MORE FEATURES]
     FP's Favorite Reads of 2013
Each year Foreign Policy magazine's editors and columnists review their favorite reads of the year. For 2013 Kalev reviewed Anthony Olcott's book "Open Source Intelligence in a Networked World." Olcott manages to transform what is often viewed as the mundane stepchild of intelligence into an exciting and gripping global thriller, where, to paraphrase Samuel Wilson, Sherlock Holmes outwits James Bond by spending a little more time thinking instead of doing. He takes the reader on a thoroughly enlightening journey that at the end leaves one not only imparted with tremendous wisdom, but all the happier and entertained for taking the ride. While he himself does not suggest this, Olcott's book in many ways presents a compelling argument that with more sophisticated and intelligent analysis of open sources, we could achieve a great many more of our intelligence needs. All it would take is for those spies in the dark to spend a little more time reading the news and a little less time making it. [MORE FEATURES]
     New Daily GDELT Global Material Conflict Trend Report Debuts
We are tremendously excited to announce the latest addition to GDELT, a new prototype daily trend report that summarizes major trends in Material Conflict across the globe, combining the GDELT event and Global Knowledge Graph streams! Each morning a new report is generated synthesizing macro-level change across the entire global news system to identify those countries undergoing the greatest change in media coverage of Material Conflict events within its borders, offering a reasonable approximation of the daily global consensus view of the most "important" emerging Material Conflict developments across the entire world. Detailed profiles are generated for the top 10 countries, visualizing actor breakdowns, geographic change, thematic focus, and temporal context! [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping Half a Million Hours of the Internet Archive's TV Archive: Interactive Geographic Search
In collaboration with the Internet Archive Kalev mapped nearly half a million hours of American television news programming covering the last three years. Using "fulltext geocoding" computer algorithms, the closed captioning of each broadcast was processed entirely by computer to identify, disambiguate, and map every mention of a location worldwide. This interactive map allows you to select a date range and television station to interactive drill into the geography of American Television News programming over the last three years and see how each station differs in its coverage of the world. Read more in the announcement or see the Atlantic article. [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping the Geography of American Television News
This collaboration with the Internet Archive's Television News Archive is exploring the geography of American television news using the Archive's collection of more than a half-million hours of television totalling 1PB of video and nearly 3 billion words of closed captioning. The largest study of television news ever conducted, this project is applying whole-corpus analysis to entire archive piloting a new computational model that combines a virtual machine physically located at the Internet Archive with new technological and methodological workflows. An early preview of this research debuted at the Internet Archive's October 24th gala in San Francisco. Read the Atlantic article for more detail. [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping Half a Million Hours of the Internet Archive's TV Archive: Three-Year Animation
In collaboration with the Internet Archive Kalev mapped nearly half a million hours of American television news programming covering the last three years. Using "fulltext geocoding" computer algorithms, the closed captioning of each broadcast was processed entirely by computer to identify, disambiguate, and map every mention of a location worldwide. This animated map allows you you see the overall geography of American Television News programming over the last three years and how it has changed day by day. Read more in the announcement or see the Atlantic article. [MORE FEATURES]
     Kalev Presents at EIHR Estonian Conference on Human Rights and Freedom to Association
In December 2013, on the 65th anniversary of the passage of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Kalev traveled to Tallinn, Estonia, to present at the Estonian Institute of Human Rights' Annual Conference on Human Rights 2013: Human Rights and Freedom to Association. He spoke on the emerging application of big data towards monitoring human rights around the world and increasingly giving a voice to citizens to document the world around them. [MORE FEATURES]
     Quoted in Discover Magazine's 100 Top Stories of 2013
Kalev was quoted as an "expert in big data," discussing the ways in which data exhaust is being used by governments to measure and monitor global human society in the #4 most important science story of 2013 in Discover Magazine's "The Year in Science: The 100 Top Stories of 2013", available December 3rd, 2013. [MORE FEATURES]
     Featured Voice for Foreign Policy Magazine
Kalev Leetaru is now a Featured Voice for Foreign Policy magazine, writing a regular column covering the ways in which big data is forever changing our understanding of global society and how we practice global diplomacy. [MORE FEATURES]
     Georgetown Presentation on Big Data, Global Diplomacy and Our Digital Heartbeat
Kalev Leetaru spoke to the Georgetown University campus about the ways in which big data is being used to understand global human society in revolutionary new ways and how the GDELT project is giving us a powerful new dataset to peer into our collective digital heartbeat. [MORE FEATURES]
     Networking the Newsmakers of the Global Iran Discourse (GDELT Global Knowledge Graph) - Foreign Policy
Kalev Leetaru used the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph to identify all people mentioned in articles referencing any location in Iran between April and October 2013. A list was compiled of every person mentioned in each article, and all names mentioned in an article together were connected. The end result was a network diagram of all of the people mentioned in the global news coverage of Iran over the last seven months and who has appeared with whom in that coverage. Clustering and community finding were used make the overall macro-level structure of the network instantly clear, teasing apart the clusters and connections among the newsmakers defining Iranian news coverage. The resulting network even correctly captures internal and external affiliation of actors, offering a powerful new approach to rapidly understand a world in constant change. [MORE FEATURES]
     GDELT DC Hackathon Hosted by Gallup - Dec 18, 2013 - Join Us!
Following the tremendously successful second annual GDELT Hackathon held at Penn State University this past September, we are excited to announce the GDELT DC Hackathon, hosted by Gallup, to be held in the beautiful ornate conference room of the Gallup Building (901 F St NW) in Washington, DC on Wednesday, December 18, 2013. This all-day event will open with a welcome from Jim Clifton, Chairman and CEO of Gallup and feature a morning session introducing GDELT and how it is being used today, followed by an afternoon "hackathon" where the technical and non-technical alike can come together and explore how GDELT can be used to measure, model, visualize, and even forecast global human society in powerful new ways. Check out the agenda and register so we know how many to expect! [MORE FEATURES]
     SBP 2014 Conference Grand Data Challenge Features GDELT
The Grand Data Challenge of the 2014 International Conference on Social Computing, Behavioral-Cultural Modeling, & Prediction (SBP14) is titled "Computing Human Society through the Global News" and is based on GDELT. The Grand Data Challenge invites participants to pioneer innovative new bleeding-edge applications of GDELT from visualization and interaction to modeling and forecasting. Potential applications include "spatial, temporal and network methodologies and their interactions," "identifying latent 'influencers' of social movement and media-based political competition," "experimentally validate and improve models for social phenomena," "visualize social movements of different types on all levels at a glance," "propose solutions to societal problems including health care and public safety using data- and model- based reasoning," and "to suggest new creative applications using the GDELT data." Submissions are due December 20, 2013. See the conference website for more details! [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping Obamacare through the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph - Foreign Policy
Using a combination of the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph and the Internet Archive's Television News Archive, Kalev Leetaru analyzed national media discourse around Obamacare, including producing a sequence of heatmaps via the Global Knowledge Graph that chart the darkening stormclouds of public opinion. [MORE FEATURES]
     USAID/HU Tech Challenge for Atrocity Forecasting Uses GDELT
The United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Humanity United Model Challenge, the final round of the Tech Challenge for Atrocity Prevention, "asked innovative problem solvers to create algorithmic models that can help forecast when and where mass atrocities are likely to occur." Nearly 100 contributors submitted 618 algorithms to the competition, with the winning submission being "especially successful at predicting atrocities in regions with limited or no past history of mass violence, taking into account 23 diverse geographic, socio-political and historical violence factors within each region." The Political Instability Task Force (PITF) data on worldwide atrocities was the gold event set that participants had to forecast, while historic PITF data and GDELT were the two input datasets. Read the press release or see the list of winners of the competition. Read this article for more details on the winning algorithms. [MORE FEATURES]
     Oxford Internet Institute Features Visualization of GDELT
The Oxford Internet Institute produced this eye-catching visualization of the geography of the news media based on the GDELT global event stream. They include a number of interesting findings regarding how the world's nations are interconnected in the eyes of the global media and who gets attention and where. OII also produced this infographic breaking their findings down by region. [MORE FEATURES]
     The Debut of the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph
At long last, we are tremendously excited to announce the debut of the GDELT Global Knowledge Graph (GKG), which expands GDELT's ability to quantify global human society beyond cataloging physical occurrences towards actually representing all of the latent dimensions, geography, and network structure of the global news. To sum up the GKG in a single sentence, it connects every person, organization, location, count, theme, news source, and event across the planet into a single massive network that captures what's happening around the world, what its context is and who's involved, and how the world is feeling about it, every single day. [MORE FEATURES]
     A Secure and Free Internet - United Nations General Assembly
Kalev was an invited participant in the "A Secure and Free Internet" event at the United Nations General Assembly on September 23, 2013, hosted in the UN Dag Hammarskjold Library Auditorium. Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves gave the keynote address at the meeting, which focused on the role of cybersecurity and online privacy in the internet era. [MORE FEATURES]
     Gaza Goes Viral: An Analysis of Influence - Google Ideas Summit
At the Google Ideas Conflict in a Connected World summit in New York City on October 22, 2013, GNIP presented the results of an analysis of how Twitter was used by the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) and Hamas during the October 2013 Gaza conflict in the first full-scale study of the use of social media in conflict. Kalev worked with Google and GNIP to sketch out the set of analyses and the overall technical instantiation of the key research questions, while GNIP conducted the actual analysis. Watch Chris Moody, CEO of GNIP, present several highlights from the findings and a panel discussion of the role of social media in conflict in the region. [MORE FEATURES]
     Forecasting the Future of Afghanistan
Joshua Stevens, John Beieler, and Jay Yonamine created this absolutely stunning visualization of the past quarter-century of material conflict in Afghanistan, bringing together into a single visualization an incredibly rich spatio-temporal summary of the country's history. Even more powerfully, they coupled this with a forecasting model estimating likely changes in the level of material conflict across the country through December 2013 and June 2014. [MORE FEATURES]
     Foreign Policy Runs GDELT Front Page and Slate Covers
Foreign Policy ran a front-page story by Dana Stuster featuring the global and Egyptian protest maps created by John Beieler at Pennsylvania State University using GDELT and the CartoDB mapping platform. Slate's Joshua Keating also covered John's interactive Egyptian protest map, while the National Journal featured the global protests map as its Chart of the Day for August 23rd. [MORE FEATURES]
     GDELT 1979-2013 Overlaid onto NASA Night Lights Imagery
This visualization overlays all locations worldwide containing one or more GDELT events of any type or actor between 1979-2013 (red) on top of the NASA Night Lights Imagery (see more of NASA Night Lights sequence) (blue) to explore the spatial overlap between areas with widespread availability of electricty (population areas most likely to have substantial news coverage) and the geography of GDELT's global coverage. Google's Big Query service was used to compile a histogram of event locations across all event types across the entire quarter-billion records in just under 6 seconds, which was then exported to GraphViz for the final visualization. Each red dot indicates one or more events at that location: the dots are not sized, so a single point could represent one event or one million events at that location over the 1979-2013 period. It is clear from this map that GDELT has very strong global coverage, covering far beyond the areas of greatest electrical availability and reaching deep into surrounding regions. GDELT's emphasis on Africa and Latin America are also clearly visible, as is the fact that the only regions with low GDELT representation are those with little electricity or human habitation. Read more about the methodology on the GDELT Blog in Visualizing Global GDELT Coverage. [MORE FEATURES]
     John Beieler's Interactive Map of Worldwide Protests in 2013
John Beieler at Pennsylvania State University used CartoDB to create this incredible interactive heatmap of all protest activity worldwide captured in GDELT January-June 2013. Use your mouse scrollwheel or the zoom buttons at the top to interactively zoom all the way down to see micro-level clusters and the spatial distribution or zoom out to see macro-level patterns, including key focal areas. You can even click on a point to see more information about the number of protests at that location! It was covered by both the The Guardian and Wired Magazine! Read more about the methodology on John's blog in Mapping Protest Data. [MORE FEATURES]
     New Scientist Magazine Maps the Syrian Civil War
Peter Aldhous of New Scientist Magazine put together this impressive interactive map of the Syrian civil war that breaks the violence down by quarter to plot how the conflict has been evolving. This map is an interactive companion to an article by Douglas Heaven in the May 13, 2013 issue of the magazine titled "World's largest events database could predict conflict". The map demonstrates using hexagonal binning to cluster event records due to the high density and tight clustering of events around key cities. You can use the time box in the upper-right of the display to interactively move through the conflict quarter by quarter from 2011 to 2013 to see how the conflict has evolved spatially. [MORE FEATURES]
     Rolf Fredheim's Russia Network Visualizations
Rolf Fredheim of Cambridge University created this visually stunning series of network displays of Russia's interactions with the world over the past quarter-century, as viewed through the eyes of GDELT. He even includes a YouTube video showing how the network changes week by week over the entire 1979 to 2012 period. He also discusses his observations of using GDELT for macro-level pattern detection. [MORE FEATURES]
     David Masad's Python Visualizations
David Masad of George Mason University put together this great tutorial demonstrating how to replicate some of Rolf Fredheim's R-based visualizations for those more familiar or comfortable with Python. He creates some really impressive publication-ready visuals and includes all of the source code used to create them, along with copious documentation and discussion, making it easy to get started mapping GDELT. [MORE FEATURES]
     Alex Hanna's Egyptian Timeline
Alex Hanna at the University of Wisconsin-Madison made this great timeline showing the 2011 Egyptian revolution and the various actor classes involved, as captured through the eyes of GDELT. He discusses using the data to understand social movements and political sociology, especially protest behavior, and leveraging the actor codes to lend detail to the underlying social dynamics. [MORE FEATURES]
     Rolf Fredheim's Visualization Tutorial
Rolf Fredheim of Cambridge University put together a fantastic assortment of basic analyses and some sophisticated visualizations of GDELT, including a number of publication-friendly maps and graphs. He also shows how to create some fantastic network visualizations of actor interconnections. He includes all of the source code and descriptions of how he generated each image. [MORE FEATURES]
     Jay Yonamine's Forecasting Future Violence in Afghanistan
Jay Yonamine of Penn State used GDELT in his doctoral dissertation to explore how the spatial resolution of GDELT can be used to better estimate future violence at the district level in Afghanistan. This sequence of maps created by Joshua Stevens is part of a broader display showing the progression of unrest in the country since the US invasion. In this chapter of his dissertation, Jay explores how the high spatial resolution of GDELT can be used to increase the accuracy of violence forecasts in the country. [MORE FEATURES]
     The Sphere of Influence and Declassification Engine Projects
Led by Matthew Connelly at Columbia University, the Declassification Engine project is a wide-ranging effort involving "historians, journalists, legal scholars, statisticians, and computer scientists joining together to [explore] novel statistical/machine learning methodologies" focusing on "attributing authorship to anonymous documents, characterizing attributes of redacted text, and modeling spatial and temporal patterns of diplomatic communications." Already the project has demonstrated using big data approaches to unredact documents that have been released piecemeal over long periods of time, to predict the contents of fully redacted passages, and to visualize global patterns of American diplomacy. Kalev helped create the Sphere of Influence visualization. The project has been extensively covered from Wired to CJR, to The New Yorker. [MORE FEATURES]
     Google Constitute: Digitizing the World's Constitutions
The Google Constitute project has made headlines across the world in its efforts to digitize and make searchable the world's constitutions, to find ways technology can continue to support and improve constitution design, allowing drafters, academics and global citizens to find and compare the world's constitutions. Kalev architected the entire that supported the transfer of the analog print world of constitutions to the digital world of Google Constitute. Over roughly five years he established the mass digitization workflows, data management processes, and built the entire infrastructure from realtime network diagrams and readouts on coding progress and communications, to novel indicators and evaluation metrics, to the coding system itself. In 2012 he coauthored an article with the team on the Interpretability of Law: Lessons from the Decoding of National Constitutions. [MORE FEATURES]
     Opening Presentation at Wolfram Data Summit 2013
Kalev gave the opening presentation at the Wolfram Data Summit 2013 on the 25th anniversary of the release of Mathematica, presenting on the world of big data and how the GDELT project is reshaping our understanding of human society. [MORE FEATURES]
     John Deere Big Data Summit 2013
In October 2013, Kalev presented at the John Deere Big Data Summit 2013, designed "to bring together analytic and big data thought leaders from inside and outside the company to showcase cutting edge academic thinking, applications and real life examples." Over the past decade Kalev has worked with a number of the Fortune 50 on a vast array of big data and bleeding-edge analytic projects, helping to reshape and rethink how we leverage the opportunities and potential of big data analytics for the corporate world. [MORE FEATURES]
     CNBC Runs Segment on GDELT for its Big Data Download Program
CNBC television ran a segment on GDELT for its Big Data Download program titled "An Ambitious Project to Track Global Political History" and discussing it as a powerful new dataset for tracking global activity and political risk. [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping the Global Twitter Heartbeat: The Geography of Twitter
This collaboration with SGI and the University of Illinois' CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) Laboratory debuted the first-ever analysis of the geography of social media, exploring for the first time the "where" of Twitter. The study was covered throughtout the world, including the print edition of the New York Times to the BBC, The Telegraph, Foreign Policy, Irish Independent, Smithsonian Magazine, AFP, ANI, Times of India, Wired, and hundreds of other outlets. [MORE FEATURES]
     Dissertation: Can We Forecast Conflict?
Kalev's doctoral dissertation was successfully defended in March 2013 at the University of Illinois Graduate School of Library and Information Science titled "Can We Forecast Conflict? A Framework for Forecasting Global Human Societal Behavior Using Latent Narrative Indicators." His chair was Les Gasser and his committee consisted of Vernon Burton, Marshall Scott Poole, and John Unsworth. It presented a novel framework for evaluating new classes of latent-based forecasting measures on high-resolution geographically-enriched quantitative databases of human behavior and in particular, the automated identification and tracking of "master naratives" (metanarratives) in the global news sphere. At the time of its publication, it was the largest political event dataset ever created, surpassed today only by GDELT. See both the full dissertation and dissertation defense slides. [MORE FEATURES]
     Interview with Wired Magazine: Big Data and the Death of the Theorist
In December 2012 while in London, Kalev spoke with Ian Steadman of Wired Magazine about the future of big data in studying human society and the role big data analytics is playing vis-a-vis the traditional realm of theory-driven scholarship. [MORE FEATURES]
     Mapping the Civil War Through HathiTrust's One Billion Pages of Books
In a collaboration with noted Civil War historian Vernon Burton, Kalev mapped the geography of the Civil War discourse through HathiTrust's nearly one billion pages of digitized books 1800-1923, developing new approaches to geographic narrative analysis and mapping to cope with the scale, historical discourse, and complexities of working with nearly a billion pages of material. The first results of this collaboration were presented in Professor Burton's Presidential Address to the Southern History Association. [MORE FEATURES]
     Council on Foreign Relations Workshop on Social Media and Conflict Prevention
In December 2012, Kalev traveled to Washington DC to speak at the Council on Foreign Relations Workshop on Social Media and Conflict Prevention, hosted by the Council's Center for Preventive Action. Other speakers included Assistant Secretary of State for Conflict and Stabilization Operations Frederick Barton. Kalev's speech surveyed an array of projects he is involved in that blend social and mainstream media in realtime assessments of populations around the world. In January 2013 he was among four experts interviewed for CFR's Ask the Experts: Social Media and Conflict Prevention thoughtpiece. [MORE FEATURES]
     ICCM Talk at World Bank on Realtime Automated Risk Forecasting
In October 2012, Kalev traveled to Washington DC to speak at the International Conference of Crisis Mappers (ICCM 2012) at the World Bank headquarters on the area of Realtime Automated Risk Forecasting, leveraging the emerging world of massive "big data" and enormous computational resources to assess the realtime "pulse" of global society and spatial and temporal trends. [MORE FEATURES]
     Big Data Analytics 2012 in London
In December 2012 Kalev traveled to London to speak at Big Data Analytics 2012, the United Kingdom's "largest and most prestigious cross-industry event for the Large Enterprise Sector... bringing together CEO's, Chief Marketing Officers, Chief Financial Officers, Business Directors, Heads of BI and Chief Data Scientists to discuss how to find oppotunities in Big Data Streams with advanced analytics." Kalev spoke on his latest work on modeling global societal function using the largest shared memory supercomputer in the world, the SGI UV2000 system. [MORE FEATURES]
     United Kingdom Science & Technology Facilities Council Big Data Conference
In December 2012 Kalev traveled to Daresbury in the United Kingdom to present at the joint SGI and United Kingdom Science & Technology Facilities Council "Unleash the Power of Big Data" conference hosted on the Sci-Tech Daresbury campus. STFC is tasked with maintaining the nation at the "forefront of international science and tackling some of the most significant challenges facing society" and maintains the largest single supercomputer in the United Kingdom. Kalev spoke on his latest work on modeling global societal function using the largest shared memory supercomputer in the world, the SGI UV2000 system. [MORE FEATURES]
     National Academies Keck Futures Initiative
In November 2012 Kalev was selected to participate in the 2012 National Academies Keck Futures Initiative, The Informed Brain in a Digital World, which "brings together more than 100 of the nation's best and brightest researchers from academic, industrial, and government laboratories to ask questions about - and to discover interdisciplinary connections between - important areas of cutting-edge research. [MORE FEATURES]
     Global Twitter Heartbeat Project
In a collaboration with SGI and the University of Illinois' CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) Laboratory we debuted the first-ever realtime combined population, tone, and geographic analysis of the live Twitter Decahose (10% of all tweets globally), creating a realtime map of global dreams and fears. Over the course of the annual 2012 Supercomputing conference we displayed both live global and US maps of emotion on Twitter in realtime in the SGI booth and on its website, updated once per second, using a 256-core 4TB RAM supercomputer, the first time all of these dimensions were ever visualized of a social media stream in realtime. Additional movies were created to show Hurricane Sandy and the 2012 US presidential election as viewed through the eyes of Twitter. [MORE FEATURES]
     2012 Winner of HPCWire Editor's Choice Edge HPC Award
Kalev's 2012 collaboration with supercomputer manufacturer SGI to create the first geographic historical visualization of Wikipedia's view of the world earned the 2012 HPCWire Editor's Choice Award for "Best use of HPC in an 'edge HPC' application" and "represent the highest level of honor and recognition given to the thought leaders in the HPC community by their own during the most important supercomputing event of the year." [MORE FEATURES]
     Global Twitter Heartbeat Project: PufferSphere
In a collaboration with SGI and the University of Illinois' CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) Laboratory we debuted the first-ever realtime combined population, tone, and geographic analysis of the live Twitter Decahose (10% of all tweets globally), creating a realtime map of global dreams and fears. We displayed the live Twitter emotional heatmaps on both an 80" LCD monitor and a Pufferfish PufferSphere, which is an internally-projected spherical display which uses a fisheye lens to project an image from a bottom-mounted projector across the spherical display surface, rather than from outside onto the sphere, allowing visitors to walk directly up to the image. In essence we delivered the world on a sphere. [MORE FEATURES]
     Global Twitter Heartbeat Project: Hurricane Sandy
In a collaboration with SGI and the University of Illinois' CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) Laboratory we debuted the first-ever realtime combined population, tone, and geographic analysis of the live Twitter Decahose (10% of all tweets globally), creating a realtime map of global dreams and fears. As one demonstration, we visualized Hurricane Sandy's impact on the United States through the eyes of Twitter. [MORE FEATURES]
     Global Twitter Heartbeat Project: US Presidential Election
In a collaboration with SGI and the University of Illinois' CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) Laboratory we debuted the first-ever realtime combined population, tone, and geographic analysis of the live Twitter Decahose (10% of all tweets globally), creating a realtime map of global dreams and fears. As one demonstration, we visualized the United States Presidential Election through the eyes of Twitter. [MORE FEATURES]
     Global Twitter Heartbeat Project: Making Of
In a collaboration with SGI and the University of Illinois' CyberInfrastructure and Geospatial Information (CIGI) Laboratory we debuted the first-ever realtime combined population, tone, and geographic analysis of the live Twitter Decahose (10% of all tweets globally), creating a realtime map of global dreams and fears. This video goes behind the scenes of how this project came together. [MORE FEATURES]
     Culturomics 2.0 at TEDxTallinn
Featured in Nature, BBC, Discovery, and the media in over 100 countries, Kalev spoke about his work at TEDxTallinn. Using an archive of 100 million global news articles spanning a quarter-century, a 2.4 petabyte network of 10 billion people, places, and things, and 100 trillion relationships are used to forecast the Arab Spring, pinpoint Bin Laden's location, and visualize human society's evolution. [MORE FEATURES]
     Keynote Address at 2012 IIPC General Assembly at the Library of Congress
I presented the keynote address opening the 2012 IIPC General Assembly at the Library of Congress on my experiences and vision of the web archive as a resource for studying society in the digital era. This short case video discusses some of my work on the power of web archives as a resource for forecasting geo-political activity. [MORE FEATURES]
     Wikipedia Study Showcased on NOAA Science on a Sphere
The World According to Wikipedia, a collaboration with SGI and their new UV2 supercomputer to visualize Wikipedia's view of world history 1800-2012, is now available on the NOAA Science on a Sphere network, seen by over 24 million people a year! Read more about the Intensity and Tone visualizations. [MORE FEATURES]
     Wikipedia Study Showcases SGI UV2 Launch
In collaboration with SGI, the new UV2 supercomputer, which scales to 4,000 cores and 64TB in a single system image, was used to interactively explore Wikipedia's view of world history 1800-2012 and the underlying spatial-temporal knowledge network of Wikipedia's 4M pages, including 120 million locations and dates. This study marked the first time a digital humanities project has ever showcased the launch of a new supercomputer and captures the importance of big data in modern supercomputing. Covered widely from the New York Times to the Atlantic Wire's Chart of the Day. Movies: Tone / Intensity. [MORE FEATURES]
     SGI Wikipedia Study
SGI's new UV2 supercomputer, scalable to 64TB of RAM, was used to visualize world history 1800-2012 captured by Wikipedia. More than 80M locations and 40M dates were extracted from Wikipedia's 4M English articles to build a knowledge network of Wikipedia itself. Covered widely from the New York Times to the Atlantic Wire's Chart of the Day. Movies: Tone / Intensity. [MORE FEATURES]
     Behind The Scenes: The Making of the SGI Wikipedia Project
Get a behind-the-scenes look at the SGI Wikipedia project and learn more about how the world's largest shared-memory exploration supercomputer brought Wikipedia's view of history to life! [MORE FEATURES]
     The World According to Wikipedia
SGI's new UV2 supercomputer, scalable to 64TB of RAM, was used to visualize world history 1800-2012 captured by Wikipedia. More than 80M locations and 40M dates were extracted from Wikipedia's 4M English articles to build a knowledge network of Wikipedia itself. Covered widely from the New York Times to the Atlantic Wire's Chart of the Day. Alternative View Intensity. See More. [MORE FEATURES]
     IIPC Talk on the Future of Web Archives at the Library of Congress
Kalev gave the keynote address opening the 2012 General Assembly of the International Internet Preservation Consortium (IIPC) at the Library of Congress on his vision of the future of web archives. A longer version of his talk was syndicated on the Library of Congress blog (Part 1, Part 2, Part 3) and as an IIPC Report. [MORE FEATURES]
     New Routledge Book: Data Mining Methods for the Content Analyst
Kalev's latest book is now available from Routledge, titled Data Mining Methods for the Content Analyst: An Introduction to the Computational Analysis of Informational Content. This introductory book surveys the entire field of computational approaches to content analysis and is designed for both the new user interested in learning about computational content analysis for the first time through the experienced researcher interested in expanding his or her portfolio and learning more about the underlying theories. [MORE FEATURES]
     Culturomics 2.0 at SGI 2012 User Conference
Featured in Nature, BBC, Discovery, and the media in over 100 countries, Kalev presented his Culturomics 2.0 work as the keynote at the 2012 SGI User Conference in Orlando, Florida. See the video introducing the keynote. Using an archive of 100 million global news articles spanning a quarter-century, a 2.4 petabyte network of 10 billion people, places, and things, and 100 trillion relationships are used to forecast the Arab Spring, pinpoint Bin Laden's location, and visualize human society's evolution. [MORE FEATURES]
     Opening Big Data Week
Kalev presented some of the welcoming remarks introducing Big Data Week and touching on the incredible growth of observational social data and the datasets available today to study human societal behavior at a global scale. [MORE FEATURES]
     Culturomics 2.0 at IAB Poland 2011
Featured in Nature, BBC, Discovery, and the media in over 100 countries, Kalev presented his Culturomics 2.0 work at IAB Poland 2011, the main Polish internet and media conference. See interview with Polish media. Using an archive of 100 million global news articles spanning a quarter-century, a 2.4 petabyte network of 10 billion people, places, and things, and 100 trillion relationships are used to forecast the Arab Spring, pinpoint Bin Laden's location, and visualize human society's evolution. [MORE FEATURES]
     Culturomics 2.0 on Russia Today
Featured in Nature, BBC, Discovery, and the media in over 100 countries, Kalev was interviewed by Russian television station Russia Today. Using an archive of 100 million global news articles spanning a quarter-century, a 2.4 petabyte network of 10 billion people, places, and things, and 100 trillion relationships are used to forecast the Arab Spring, pinpoint Bin Laden's location, and visualize human society's evolution. [MORE FEATURES]
     Culturomics 2.0 on Polish Mediafun
Featured in Nature, BBC, Discovery, and the media in over 100 countries, Kalev presented his Culturomics 2.0 work at IAB Poland 2011, the main Polish internet and media conference, and was interviewed by Polish technology outlet Mediafun. Using an archive of 100 million global news articles spanning a quarter-century, a 2.4 petabyte network of 10 billion people, places, and things, and 100 trillion relationships are used to forecast the Arab Spring, pinpoint Bin Laden's location, and visualize human society's evolution. [MORE FEATURES]
     Culturomics 2.0: Forecasting Large-Scale Human Behavior Using Global News Media Tone in Time and Space
Using an archive of 100 million global news articles spanning a quarter-century, a 2.4 petabyte network of 10 billion people, places, and things, and 100 trillion relationships are used to forecast the Arab Spring, pinpoint Bin Laden's location, and visualize human society's evolution. Featured in Nature and covered in media across the world including BBC and Russia Today. [MORE FEATURES]
     Social Media Workshop
This one-hour, two-hour, or half-day shortcourse covers a wide-ranging overview of how the modern organization can make the most from social media. Topics covered include internal collaboration, connecting with customers, recruiting, crowdsourcing of ideas (both internally and from customers), brand and industry mining, customer interaction, corporate intelligence, crisis communication in the social sphere, and advanced modeling and analysis of social media. [MORE FEATURES]
     Soundbite University
Featured by ACE's The Presidency, this study traced the changing role of higher education in the national news media over the last half-century and its shift from a newsmaker to a news commentator, suggesting a need for universities to profoundly change the ways in which they interact with the press. [MORE FEATURES]
     The Carbon Capture Report
Featured in the New York Times and AAPG Explorer and with subscribers in over 100 countries, the Carbon Capture Report is one the leading global resources for daily insight into the discourse around climate change and the energy sectors. [MORE FEATURES]
     The Deeper Story of Google Books and the Open Content Alliance
Featured in Que Leer, the preeminent Spanish cultural magazine, this study was the first to quantitatively compare the Google Books and Open Content Alliance initiatives and uncover a number of unexpected similarities and differences between the projects. [MORE FEATURES]
     New Media vs Old Media: The Drudge Report
Twice featured by Columbia Journalism Review and covered by a wide range of national press, this study traces the evolution of the Drudge Report 2002-2008, using more than 170,000 snapshots taken every 2 minutes, to uncover what makes the site "tick" and how Drudge finds the stories that will go big tomorrow. [MORE FEATURES]
     Airbrushing History
Featured in the New York Times and international media, this study traces how key White House press releases were constantly revised over several years, illustrating the ease with which critical government documents can be altered in the digital era. [MORE FEATURES]

     RECENT HIGHLIGHTS
     HIGHLIGHTED PUBLICATIONS
     SPOTLIGHTS
     CONTENT ANALYSIS BOOK

Kalev's latest book is available from Routledge! Data Mining Methods for the Content Analyst: An Introduction to the Computational Analysis of Informational Content.

This introductory book surveys the entire field of computational approaches to content analysis and is designed for both the new user interested in learning about computational content analysis for the first time through the experienced researcher interested in expanding his or her portfolio and learning more about the underlying theories.


     Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone
 

The Global Database of Events, Language, and Tone (GDELT) is an initiative to construct a catalog of human societal-scale behavior and beliefs across all countries of the world over the last two centuries down to the city level globally, to make all of this data freely available for open research, and to provide daily updates to create the first "realtime social sciences earth observatory." Nearly a quarter-billion georeferenced events capture global behavior in more than 300 categories covering 1979 to present with daily updates, while the Global Knowledge Graph compiles a massive interconnected network of the world's people, organizations, locations, themes, emotions, and events.